• Two cousins grow up in the 1860s on a lonely farm in the thirsty mountain veld. Em is fat, sweet and contented, a born housewife; Lyndall, clever, restless, beautiful . . . and doomed. Their childhood is disrupted by a bombastic Irishman, Bonaparte Blenkins, who gains uncanny influence over the girls' gross, stupid stepmother . . . This novel is one of the most astonishing, least-expected fiction masterpieces of its time and one that has had an enduring influence.

  • Olive Schreiner's landmark novel, a South African classic, takes place in the rural Karoo towards the end of the 19th century. The Story of an African Farm evokes the bleakness and beauty of the arid landscape, which forms the backdrop for the stories of Lyndall and Waldo, unlikely soul mates whose lives reflect their frustrated quest for a better reality and their dreams of self-fulfillment. Originally published in 1883 under the pseudonym Ralph Iron, the novel caused a sensation when its author was revealed to be a woman. Victorian readers were intrigued by the novel's forthright feminism and sensitivity to all forms of oppression. An informative introduction by literary scholar Cherry Clayton discusses the literary, cultural and philosophical background to the novel.

  • Lyndall, Schreiner's articulate young feminist, marks the entry of the controversial New Woman into nineteenth-century fiction. Raised as an orphan amid a makeshift family, she witnesses an intolerable world of colonial exploitation. Desiring a formal education, she leaves the isolated farm for boarding school in her early teens, only to return four years later from an unhappy relationship. Unable to meet the demands of her mysterious lover, Lyndall retires to a house in Bloemfontein, where, delirious with exhaustion, she is unknowingly tended by an English farmer disguised as her female nurse. This is the devoted Gregory Rose, Schreiner's daring embodiment of the sensitive New Man.

    A cause c--eacute--;l--egrave--;bre when it appeared in London, The Story of an African Farm transformed the shape and course of the late-Victorian novel. From the haunting plains of South Africa's high Karoo, Schreiner boldly addresses her society's greatest fears - the loss of faith, the dissolution of marriage, and women's social and political independence. - ;Lyndall, Schreiner's articulate young feminist, marks the entry of the controversial New Woman into nineteenth-century fiction. Raised as an orphan amid a makeshift family, she witnesses an intolerable world of colonial exploitation. Desiring a formal education, she leaves the isolated farm for boarding school in her early teens, only to return four years later from an unhappy relationship. Unable to meet the demands of her mysterious lover, Lyndall retires to a house in Bloemfontein, where, delirious with exhaustion, she is unknowingly tended by an English farmer disguised as her female nurse. This is the devoted Gregory Rose, Schreiner's daring embodiment of the sensitive New Man.

    A cause c--eacute--;l--egrave--;bre when it appeared in London, The Story of an African Farm transformed the shape and course of the late-Victorian novel. From the haunting plains of South Africa's high Karoo, Schreiner boldly addresses her society's greatest fears - the loss of faith, the dissolution of marriage, and women's social and political independence. -

  • Olive Schreiner's landmark novel, a South African classic, takes place in the rural Karoo towards the end of the 19th century. The Story of an African Farm evokes the bleakness and beauty of the arid landscape, which forms the backdrop for the stories of Lyndall and Waldo, unlikely soul mates whose lives reflect their frustrated quest for a better reality and their dreams of self-fulfillment. Originally published in 1883 under the pseudonym Ralph Iron, the novel caused a sensation when its author was revealed to be a woman. Victorian readers were intrigued by the novel's forthright feminism and sensitivity to all forms of oppression. An informative introduction by literary scholar Cherry Clayton discusses the literary, cultural and philosophical background to the novel.

  • Filling a gap in the literature, this up-to-date introduction to the field provides an overview of current experimental techniques, basic theoretical concepts, and sample fabrication methods.
    Following an introduction, this monograph deals with optically active quantum dots and their integration into electro-optical devices, before looking at the theory of quantum confined states and quantum dots interacting with the radiation field. Final chapters cover spin-spin interaction in quantum dots as well as spin and charge states, showing how to use single spins for break-through quantum computation. A conclusion and outlook round off the volume.
    The result is a primer providing the essential basic knowledge necessary for young researchers entering the field, as well as semiconductor and theoretical physicists, PhD students in physics and material sciences, electrical engineers and materials scientists.

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